La Granja Ibiza
Farm Fiestas: Dia de los Muertos
On the island that shuts down as a prime summer vacation spot until next season, we winter residents eagerly follow the Mexican surplus festivity suit.
Low season in Ibiza is the high time to make friends, to get to better know neighbours, for all natives and winter inhabitants to feel being together.
Mexican calendar is full of days – each is anything but mundane, including Mondays. All in all, you find some 10,000 fiestas being held throughout the country each year – official and unofficial; national, regional, local; religious and secular. Their number, diversity of the occasions and the variety of celebratory expressions all make for one of Mexico's most distinctive cultural traits, which qualifies the populace as easily the most fun-loving people on earth. Mexicans readily admit to it by often saying: "Somos muy fiesteros".

On the island that shuts down as a prime summer vacation spot until next season, we winter residents eagerly follow the Mexican surplus festivity suit. Making sure your inner sunshine never turns to clouds to correspond with the Weather Channel, we suggest you stay tuned for our fiestas – some popular ones, some unheard of, others being our blank-slate inventions, hilarious anthropological hacks… Low season in Ibiza is the high time to make friends, to get to better know neighbours, for all natives and winter inhabitants to feel being together. FARM FIESTAS are all about that – starting Monday, October 31st with Dia de los Muertos.

That the Day of the Dead should be full of joy may strike as something hard to come to terms with in a flash. Yes, it is precisely that: a cheerful welcome for the souls of the dead as they return to enjoy the pleasures they once knew or would have had in the company of their close friends, loving relatives, good partners and happy strangers.

We welcome the spirits as we should in this tradition, as ancient as death itself – with the creation of an ofrenda (altar). Its most important elements are water, wind, fire, and earth. Water is offered to quench their thirst – the souls are coming long way. We light candles to refer to fire, while the wind is signified with paper ornaments hanging and responsive to the movement of air. The earth element is represented by food, usually sweet bread. Photos or/and small personal belongings complete the altar de muerto.

Since the Day of the Dead is a celebration rather than mourning, prepare for having a good time, like you mean it, with uplifting music and dancing to animate the evening. Anything to let the dead have the time of their lives.